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Applicants Who Exclude Their Own Resumes From Consideration

| Jan 11, 2018 | blog |

In a recent blog, we have discussed the notion of culture fit and the increased perception that hiring for similar personalities and like demographics has become a double-edged sword. It is not an uncommon belief that culture fit has become a thinly-veiled excuse for ageism with hiring managers actively working to dispel this notion. There are other dangers, though, that applicants face from the very outset.

Hiring managers, interview screeners and HR generalists have various methods in place to identify those who will reach the next stage of the hiring process. Unfortunately, it is nearly impossible for an applicant to guess how to correctly position themselves.

Experience and salary requirements. By answering these two questions honestly, an applicant might unwittingly remove themselves from consideration.

Many applicants come to a new job to pursue a new career or perhaps life circumstances have changed and they can work for less money – meaning less stress. These are only two of the possible scenarios that might make a candidate look like he or she has far overstepped the experience requirements of the current job posting.

In a recent LinkedIn post, the author highlights several possible reasons why having experience might be a detriment to getting a new job.

  • Hiring managers worry that you’ll get bored and leave.
  • Supervisors might be concerned that they cannot instruct or discipline someone with more experience than they have.
  • Supervisors might see you as eventual competition.
  • You might challenge managers on their leadership direction.
  • A younger supervisor might feel as if you are judging their decisions.

While none of these factors might be true in your case, they might subconsciously influence a hiring manager’s decisions. This mindset can be devastating, so it is crucial that applicants understand the unconscious biases they could be potentially facing through the hiring process. Employment law is a complex legal area and it is wise to understand your options and any unfair procedures you are up against.