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Movie producer fired after allegations of sexual harassment

| Oct 13, 2017 | Employment Law for Employees |

New York residents can often name the actors who portray riveting characters in their favorite movies. They may be able to recognize the work of directors who include trademark effects or stylistic choices in the films they release. Usually, though, they may not have a clue who financed the movie as a producer.

However, it is the rare movie buff that has not heard of the Weinstein Company or at least seen one of its critically acclaimed features, such as Good Will Hunting and Pulp Fiction. Business head Harvey Weinstein has been a regular at awards shows and a spokesman for his film production company. And, recently, he has been in the news for events unrelated to his backing of new films.

Many women have come forward and accused Weinstein of sexual harassment. Allegations have come from actresses and company employees alike, each claiming that Weinstein propositioned them, requested lewd favors from them, or went so far as to state that he could advance their careers if they acquiesced to his sexual demands.

In light of the allegations made against Weinstein, he has been fired by the board of his company. Employers who create hostile work environments and perpetuate corporate cultures that condone harassment of a sexual nature are in violation of both state and federal laws.

Sexual harassment is a serious problem for employees in all industries and at all levels of their professions. Individuals who have had sexual conditions placed on their employment are encouraged to reach out to employment law advocates who represent victims of sexual harassment.

Source: The New York Times, “Harvey Weinstein Paid Off Sexual Harassment Accusers for Decades,” Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, Oct. 5, 2017