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Mitchell Pollack & Associates PLLC

Con Ed employees seeking $20 million in sexual harassment suit

| Nov 25, 2015 | Sexual Harassment |

 

Con Ed is again finding itself in hot water months after the September sexual harassment ruling that awarded $3.8 million to three hundred female employees. Con Edison is the utilities company serving much of New York City and the surrounding area.

The two women who first exposed Con Ed in the suit are now seeking $20 million in damages, stating that although they went to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, they still have the right to proceed despite the previous settlement. The women also expressed annoyance at the New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman did not do much consulting with them prior to the ruling.

From the previous settlement, most female employees affected will receive $5,000, but victims of more serious harassment may be receiving between $30,000 and $150,000. In the previous settlement, it was determined that Con Ed allowed a hostile work environment for its female workers.

Among the claims by the two women were allegations that one of their bosses requested that she be his mistress, and that she was denied overtime following her refusal.

Employees in New York state and throughout the country have the right to work in an environment free of discrimination and sexual harassment. These rights are protected by various local, state and federal laws, and are addressed by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Anyone who believes that they have been a victim of sexual harassment, should file a claim to protect themselves and their co-workers. A victim may wish to speak with a local law firm familiar with employment law to determine the best way to proceed.

Source: New York Post, “Women who exposed sexual harassment at Con Ed seek $20M,” Julia Marsh, Nov. 23, 2015