PLEASE NOTE: To protect our safety as well as the safety of our clients with respect to the threats of COVID-19, our attorneys are currently working remotely. We are, however, responding to website inquiries and offering the ability to confer with us via telephone, email, and video conferencing. Please call our office to discuss your options and/or send us an email through the website inquiry form, and we will respond as soon as reasonably possible.

Retaliation, termination common among sexual harassment victims

On Behalf of | Sep 9, 2020 | Sexual Harassment |

You have a right to feel comfortable in your New York place of employment. If someone sexually harasses you, you should also be able to feel comfortable speaking out about it without having to fear retaliation. Research shows, however, that the majority of workplace sexual harassment victims who come forward face more hardships after doing so.

According to the Mercury News, a study of more than 46,000 sexual harassment claims filed within a recent four-year period revealed that many victims of workplace sexual harassment face termination or retaliation afterward. The study also showed that you are more likely to experience these issues if you are female, with women making 81% of workplace sexual harassment allegations.

Termination after reporting sexual harassment

The study found that 64% of individuals who experience and report on-the-job sexual harassment lose their jobs within one year of making their reports. The high chance of termination may be why so many employees who experience sexual harassment never report it. Research shows that 99.8% of those subjected to sexual harassment never file formal complaints.

Retaliation after sexual harassment

You also face a high risk of having your employer retaliate against you after you report sexual harassment at work. Nearly 70% of employees who made formal sexual harassment claims say they experienced some type of retaliation after doing so.

Retaliation manifests in many ways, and it may not always be overt. In some cases, your employer may retaliate against you by giving you less-favorable duties or hours. In others, you may not receive a raise or promotion you otherwise would had you not come forward about your experience.